Lock Every Door by Riley Sager, 4 Stars

Why are we so obsessed with spooky buildings? Not even just haunted, but buildings that you feel weird in. Did it start with The Shining? Probably not, I suppose the fascination has been around for a long time. Because some places just have spirits that linger.

Do you believe in ghosts? I remember in college even my dorm seemed a bit ominous. It was called The Mayflower and it was on the edge of Iowa City, I don’t even know if it was still technically considered campus, I think it was an off-campus dorm. And it was huge. It housed over a thousand students on two wings and eight floors.

I lived on the L-shaped wing, but the other wing was just one long hallway. My roommate sophomore year thought it would be fun to get a big wheel and ride it up and down the hallways late at night saying “Red rum” in a creepy voice. If you knew her, this would be hilarious. I’m not sure she ever did it though.

But I digress. Today I’m reviewing Lock Every Door by Riley Sager.

From the Publisher:

No visitors. No nights spent away from the apartment. No disturbing the other residents, all of whom are rich or famous or both. These are the only rules for Jules Larsen’s new job as an apartment sitter at the Bartholomew, one of Manhattan’s most high-profile and mysterious buildings. Recently heartbroken and just plain broke, Jules is taken in by the splendor of her surroundings and accepts the terms, ready to leave her past life behind.

As she gets to know the residents and staff of the Bartholomew, Jules finds herself drawn to fellow apartment sitter Ingrid, who comfortingly reminds her of the sister she lost eight years ago. When Ingrid confides that the Bartholomew is not what it seems and the dark history hidden beneath its gleaming facade is starting to frighten her, Jules brushes it off as a harmless ghost story . . . until the next day, when Ingrid disappears.

Searching for the truth about Ingrid’s disappearance, Jules digs deeper into the Bartholomew’s sordid past and into the secrets kept within its walls. What she discovers pits Jules against the clock as she races to unmask a killer, expose the building’s hidden past, and escape the Bartholomew before her temporary status becomes permanent.

My Review:

Living in luxury without paying rent and actually being paid to live there. Sounds too good to be true, right? That’s what Jules thought too. But her life was in such disarray that she really didn’t have any choice, or any way to survive if she didn’t take the apartment sitting gig.

So she finds herself living in an amazing two-story furnished apartment looking over Central Park in all it’s autumn splendor. She isn’t supposed to really talk to the residents unless they talk to her, but she can talk to the other apartment sitters like her. Except they seem to few and far between, and it seems like none of them every stay the full three months of their contract. Of course, Jules begins to wonder why.

It’s easy to find mystery lurking behind every corner in a super old, mysterious building with a speckled past. But Jules starts to suspect more than just old skeletons. I don’t want to give away too much–just trust me and read it!

Lock Every Door is a perfect summer read. A little spooky, but nothing some bright sunlight on the beach can’t tame. It’s got mystery, intrigue and a plot more sinister than you can imagine. I’ve loved Sager’s other books, Final Girls and The Last Time I Lied. She stays true to her writing with this one.

Special thanks to Netgalley and Dutton for an e-galley in exchange for my honest review. Lock Every Door is out July 2! Get your copy!

Indiebound

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